Wildfires near Fort Nelson merge

The Donnie Creek, West Conroy Creek, Hockey Creek and Katah Creek wildfires have merged, according to the BC Wildfire Service.

Energeticcity is the voice of the Peace.  But we need your help. Give $10 a month today and be the reason we can cover the next story!

A large cloud of smoke taken from the air over a forested area.
Donnie Creek wildfire smoke. (BCWS)

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The Donnie Creek, West Conroy Creek, Hockey Creek and Katah Creek wildfires have merged, according to the BC Wildfire Service.

The combination of the wildfires is now referred to as just the Donnie Creek wildfire. It is estimated at 118,000 hectares and is managed by the Donnie Creek Complex, which also manages the Klua Lakes and the Muskwa River wildfires.

The Klua Lakes wildfire is now estimated at 18,263 hectares, and the Muskwa River wildfire is 6,297 hectares.

All three wildfires in the Donne Creek Complex are classified as out of control.

On Friday, personnel will use parallel and indirect methods of attack with ground crews, aviation resources and structure protection personnel working on protecting infrastructure in the area.

According to BC Wildfire Service (BCWS), crews are seeing heavy smoke low to the ground, which could mean less fire growth.

BCWS says eight helicopters, 11 structure protection personnel and 14 support workers are assigned to the Donnie Creek Complex, with heavy equipment and unit crew on the way.

The Peace River Regional District recently made changes to the evacuation orders and alerts in the area of the Donnie Creek wildfire.

There are currently approximately 15 wildfires in the Peace region.

In Fort St. John, the air quality is high to very high risk due to the smoke. The special air quality statement is still in effect.

Winds in Fort St. John on Friday are blowing northwest at 24 kilometres an hour, with gusts reaching 42 kilometres an hour.

For the latest wildfire information, visit BCWS’ website. 

Thanks for Reading!

Energeticcity.ca is the voice of the Peace, bringing issues that matter to the forefront with independent journalism. Our job is to share the unique values of the Peace region with the rest of B.C. and make sure those in power hear us. From your kids’ lemonade stand to natural resource projects, we cover it–but we need your support.

 

Give $10 a month to Energeticcity.ca today and be the reason we can cover the next story.

Author

Social media doesn't show you everything!

Don't miss a story

This site uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By continuing to use this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with our privacy policy.