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HOUSTON, B.C. – RCMP frontline officers working from the Community-Industry Safety Office are continuing to conduct patrols along the Morice West Forest Service Road to ensure the safety of individuals at the Healing Centre, Coastal GasLink employees, and general public travelling along the corridor.

According to RCMP, on January 6, officers attended the 39.5-kilometre mark and were stopped by a blockade of fallen trees.

Officers conducted foot patrols towards the 44-kilometre mark and noted several dozen trees had been felled or partially cut, ready to be felled, across the roadway.

Along with felled trees, RCMP also found three stacks of tires along with flammables.

RCMP say they are impartial in this dispute and their priority is to facilitate a dialogue between the various stakeholders involved, with hopes that these efforts will result in a resolution.

The B.C. Supreme Court granted an injunction to Coastal GasLink on Dec. 31. The order stamped Tuesday provides details of the court injunction.

Previous injunction and enforcement orders remained in effect until the new order was issued, Coastal GasLink spokeswoman Suzanne Wilton said.

Obstructing access was already prohibited under the previous orders and they also included enforcement provisions.

“We continue to believe that dialogue is preferable to confrontation while engagement and a negotiated resolution remain possible,” Wilton said in an email.

The company declined an interview request.

The order does not apply to a metal gate on the west side of a bridge outside the Unist’ot’en camp unless it is used to prevent or impede the workers’ access.

Hereditary chiefs negotiated last year with RCMP for the gate to remain outside the camp, which is home to some members of one of the First Nation’s 13 house groups, so long as it would not be used to prevent workers from accessing the worksite.

Fourteen people were arrested by armed officers at a checkpoint constructed along the road leading to both the Unist’ot’en camp and the Coastal GasLink work site on Jan. 7, 2019.

The company has signed agreements with all 20 elected First Nation councils along the 670-kilometre pipeline route, but the five Wet’suwet’en hereditary clan chiefs say no one can access the land without their consent.

The pipeline is part of the $40-billion LNG Canada project that will export Canadian natural gas to Asian markets.

Coastal GasLink shared photos Tuesday of what it says are more than 100 trees that have been felled across the logging road.

At a press conference Tuesday, hereditary chief Na’moks called for construction to cease and for the B.C. government to revoke the company’s permits.

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