FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John library is enjoying an action-packed summer thanks to partnerships with local community groups.  

This Saturday, the Charlie Lake Conservation Society will host a crafting afternoon to promote their August bat walks and talk about the species in general. It’s not the first time the library has partnered with the society, meeting last week to learn all about micro-organisms living in Charlie Lake through the Curiosity Club program.  

Library program co-ordinator Alisa Lurie says participants used microscopes and magnifying glasses to get a closer look at what’s living in the lake’s water.  

“It was a really fantastic experience to offer families and kids. They might not have had the chance to see things close up that are living in the lake and it’s fascinating to see what’s there,” she said. “The older kids also really enjoyed building foldable microscopes.”  

Society president Bruce Kosugi says the lake’s ecosystem is very important and was happy to share the science.  

“It was a lot fun and it kind of built off our session that we had in June out at Beatton Park, where we look at fish and look at plants, and frogs, toads, things like that,” he said. “There’s all kinds of scuds, they’re like shrimp, water fleas, mites, worms, and all sorts of algae – there’s lots of things swimming in the lake.”  

Pride, VR, and NEAT 

Lurie says the library is also starting its Youth Pride group again this week and have partnered with the North Peace Pride Society for a series of get-togethers, offering a social space.  

Virtual reality headsets will also be offered at the library soon, providing interactive learning environments for patrons.  

“We’re going to slowly start rolling that out into our programming,” Lurie said, noting local teens have already enjoyed the headsets during an evening session.  

The library has previously partnered with the Northern Environmental Action Team for afternoon activities at the community gardens, and though the library doesn’t yet have a seed library, it’s something they’re interested in.

“It’s definitely something that’s been on our radar, but we’d love to partner with someone like NEAT or other organizations interested in promoting food sustainability and literacy, or even local growers if they’d like to offer seeds,” said Lurie.   

Tom Summer, Alaska Highway News

Tom Summer is a Peace Region journalist and has been covering the courts and more in the pages of the Alaska Highway News and Dawson Creek Mirror since 2016. Born and raised in Hudson's Hope, he's also one of the first reporters to take part in the Local Journalism Initiative, delivering news to communities in Northeast BC. Funding is available to eligible Canadian media organizations to hire journalists or pay freelance journalists to produce civic journalism for The content produced...