FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – North Peace MLA Dan Davies says he’s writing a letter to the BC Electoral Boundaries Commission to communicate his concerns about their upcoming public engagement process.

The commission will be holding public meetings in Dawson Creek and Fort Nelson to gain feedback from Northeast B.C. residents on May 10th

Davies took to social media last week to encourage residents to reach out to the Commission and request that an in-person meeting occurs in Fort St. John.

“I am also concerned and will be letting the commission know, that an 8:30 a.m. public town hall is completely inappropriate,” Davies’ post read.

“The [BC Liberal] party, on my behalf has stated these concerns and I am penning a letter personally as we speak,” Davies told Energeticcity.

Energeticcity reached out to the BC Electoral Boundaries Commission who declined to comment but said that residents are able to provide their feedback to them at any time.

public survey is also available until May 31st.

The newly formed commission was appointed last October to begin a review of the electoral boundaries that is conducted every two general elections. They will evaluate the boundaries and the number of constituents in each riding, making boundary changes to try and evenly distribute residents among MLAs.

The commission has an interactive mapping application that can be utilized to propose changes to an electoral district boundary. According to the application, “all proposals are taken into consideration by the commissioners before the preliminary report in 2022.”

MLAs in Northeast B.C. are worried this may lead to northern seats being redistributed to the Lower Mainland, making it harder for MLAs to connect with their constituents.

Through amendments to the Electoral Boundaries Commission Act passed last year, the commission can create six new electoral districts, resulting in a potential decrease in the number of northern seats in the Legislative Assembly.

Spencer Hall is a news reporter for energeticcity.ca and a recent graduate of the British Columbia Institute of Technology’s Radio Arts & Entertainment program. Growing up in Northwest B.C. made Spencer aware of the importance of local journalism, independent media, and reconciliation. In his spare time, you can find Spencer reading, playing video games, or at the FSJ dog park with his dog, Teddy.