FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John North Peace Museum kicks off the Alaska Highway’s 80th-anniversary celebrations with a documentary night.

It starts at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 22nd, at the museum and will be the first documentary night since the beginning pandemic.

The hour-long documentary was made in 1992 for the 50th anniversary of the construction of the highway. Archival film and photos will feature a 1939 motorcycle ride on one of the proposed routes, the opening ceremonies at Soldier’s Summit in November 1942 and a trip down the highway during the 50th anniversary.

According to the event page on Facebook, the museum has limited space available, especially with the pandemic, so they’re capping attendance at 50 people.

Admission is free or by donation, and masks are recommended.

Museum curator Heather Sjoblom says the Alaska Highway connected Fort St. John to the rest of the north.

“It allowed goods to be transported a lot easier. It made it a lot easier for people to travel up to the Yukon for a holiday or to any of the lodges along the Alaska highway and made it easier to get supplies in town,” Sjoblom said.

“It really opened a whole bunch of different industries. It was great for stuff like oil and gas, which use the highway to get up to different areas for where they’re working. But it’s also good for businesses in town with a whole bunch of tourists coming through.”

As the weather improves, Sjoblom says the museum plans to have more outdoor events throughout the season, including cemetery tours. They also want to do more presentations talking about the African-American contribution to the highway in the fall.

For more information, call 250-787-0430 or visit their Facebook page.