FORT ST JOHN, B.C. – Local Indigenous advocate Connie Greyeyes says the results of the geophysical examination of St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School is “a huge blow emotionally, spiritually, mentally, and physically.”

William’s Lake First Nation announced Tuesday that the results revealed 93 reflections, indicating potential human burial sites.

The First Nation put together a resource package ahead of their press conference today to support the emotional and spiritual needs of those affected by the investigation of the residential school

“The intergenerational trauma of hearing it again for everyone, it’s such a double-edged sword because what our survivors have been telling us about that school and about where they put children and what they’ve seen and what they’d experienced, it’s a validation that they were telling you the truth,” Greyeyes said.

“Every single indigenous person in this country that we call Canada is affected by it. When you see people that are on the street and they’re deep in addiction, those are all missing and murdered women,” Greyeyes said.

Greyeyes adds that residents don’t necessarily need to be indigenous to be affected by news of the discoveries being uncovered at residential schools.

“Even non-indigenous people are feeling that [pain]. You can’t be a human being and not feel that pain that people are experiencing right now,” Greyeyes said.

A 24-hour crisis line for those struggling with the news of residential schools at 1-800-721-0066.

Connie Greyeyes is the Northern Case Manager for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls through the Indian Residential School Survivors Society.

Greyeyes also co-organized a vigil for the 215 children found in the Kamloops residential school.