We’re are a little late on posting July’s Community Champion, but don’t fret, this champ is well worth the wait and may be familiar to anyone that frequents the Fort St. John Public Library.

Co-op highlights people in Fort St. John who should be recognized for the work they do in the community. Anyone looking to nominate a community-minded person in need of recognition, head to Energeticcity’s website.

This month’s champion is Morgan Churchill, the Children’s Services and Program Coordinator for the library. Morgan is responsible for creating, promoting and facilitating programming at the library and won the 2020 B.C. Achievement Community Award for her work in early childhood education and building relationships in the community.

Programs Morgan implements at the library focuses heavily on children, but she also runs programming for all ages as well.

“I believe it’s a really unique position that allows me to work with everything from infants, who are there with their parents, for something like Mother Goose on the Loose to the elementary age craft program, big celebrations like Harry Potter birthday parties and things like that,” said Morgan.

Morgan also helps to facilitate the book club, trivia nights and adult programming and reaches out to local organizations to inquire about partnering with the library.

Morgan says one of the best things about working at the library is the freedom she has to try different programming.

“It’s a really unique and really satisfying position because everything you can think of trying out, I have the capacity to try that out and see what we can do to add to our sense of community here.”

“I’ve had the great fortune to work with really great boards and directors who have been very open minded about what we’ve tried in the library,” said Morgan.

Morgan was born and raised in the Energetic City and left for a couple of years to further her education in Quebec City and Nova Scotia. Morgan studied English literature and education before gaining a position at the library.

The week before graduating with her education degree, Morgan says she had an internal struggle because the job posting for a children’s librarian at the library opened up.

“I had just spent all this time investing in the education path. But, something like this position at our library comes up so rarely, that I had to keep tabs on it. I’m pretty, pretty happy with that decision,” says Morgan, who had been working as a summer student at the library running the reading program before graduating.

Generally, anyone seeking a librarian position in a bigger city will be required to get their master’s degree in library and information sciences. Morgan believes one of the reasons she got the position is because Fort St. John is a remote city.

“Luckily, I had a lot of experience working in libraries and other nonprofits.”

Ten years later, Morgan believes her education didn’t go to waste.

“A lot of the skills really overlap. My interest in education really helps inform the type of programs and the type of partnerships that I like to form.”

Now that restrictions have been lifted and the future of public gatherings is a little brighter, residents are sure to see more programming popping up at the library.

“We have a newer director in the last few months. He’s definitely is kind of chomping at the bit to get some of that stuff back up again. So when we can, we’ll get things going,” said Morgan.

Co-op’s Community Champion is highlighting people in Fort St. John who should be recognized for the work they do in the community. Anyone looking to nominate a community-minded person in need of recognition, head to Energeticcity’s website.