Home » News » Environment Canada still looking into June 30th’s storm

Environment Canada still looking into June 30th’s storm

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Last week’s severe thunderstorm still has meteorologists puzzled as to what exactly took…

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Last week’s severe thunderstorm still has meteorologists puzzled as to what exactly took place in certain areas of the Peace Region.

According to Doug Lundquist with Environment Canada, it is still unknown whether the damage to properties was from severe wind or a tornado.

“We’re studying it right now and we may not know until we can look at satellite pictures or maybe even do a flyover of the area,” says Lundquist.

Information from radar and other forms show that it was most likely straight-line winds, Lundquist says that winds reported at a forestry site were at 110 kilometres per hour on Wednesday, June 30th.

Lundquist mentions that it could take anywhere from a week or a month to go over the information, facts, satellite imagery to really get to the bottom of the cause of the damage to trees and property in the Peace.

Environment Canada does recommend looking at the ‘Weather Summaries‘ part of its website, it has information regarding any records that have been broken and when they get an answer for the wind damage it will be reported there.

Multiple residents posted the aftermath of the storm on social media. A slew of videos and photos show damaged homes and multiple trees knocked over. There were also reports of trailers being lifted off the ground.

Around 6,000 BC Hydro customers in the Peace region were without power due to downed power lines during the storm. Some residents were without power for several days.

BC Hydro crews from the Lower Mainland, Prince George and Terrace, were brought in to help local crews restore power.

Red Creek muster station by community members was set up to help the residents affected.

Many residents, businesses and organizations have donated items to the emergency station over the past several days including, generators, food and water. Residents also drove supplies to Blueberry River First Nations as the community was also impacted by the storm.

As of Tuesday at 11:30 a.m., 140 customers are still without power in northern B.C.

BC Hydro has replaced more than 330 spans of wire, 60 cross arms, 30 power poles and 15 transformers.

 

 

Do you have a news tip or a story idea?

Send it our way!

This site uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By continuing to use this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with our privacy policy.