The District of Hudson’s Hope is studying its stormwater system for the Beryl Prairie subdivision following the aftermath of severe flooding this spring.

The flooding was suspected to have been caused by a beaver dam bursting May 2, which flooded two basements and four other homes near the intersection of Tompkins Road and Coulson Road.

“Council decided to take it step by step and let’s have a stormwater management plan first, so we understand the problem,” said Mayor Dave Heiberg. “And once we understand the problem, then we can look at options for how to mitigate it.”

Urban Systems will be contracted to do the study at a cost of $20,750.

On May 11, council approved temporary repairs costing roughly $6,000, but it’s estimated a full repair for the damaged roads and culverts would cost $360,000.

Heiberg was unable to provide a concrete timeline for the completion of the assessment, but expects the study will take some time due to the scope of the issues.

“It’s not just the road, it’s everything. The stormwater plan, the culverts, whatever we decide to do.” Heiberg said. ”So Urban Systems is going to take that study on, and then we’re going to have a conversation with the residents and see what options are available to fix it.”

Reschke Road to be repaved
The District of Hudson’s Hope will spend $398,634.20 to repave one kilometre of Reschke Road in the Lynx Creek subdivision.

Council awarded Terus Construction Ltd. the contract on July 27.

“Sometimes what we do is save up the funds every couple of years, so that when do get them we’re not doing a small section, we’re doing a large section,” said Mayor Dave Heiberg. “That’s part of our multi-year plan, in terms of our strategic plan. We’re trying to do a little paving every year, to try to make it more manageable.

The 2020 capital budget earmarked $500,000 for the paving.

Beryl Prairie water upgrades
Hudson’s Hope council has awarded a $17,340 contract to Clear Blue Water Systems for upgrades to the Beryl Prairie water station.

Upgrades will include the replacement of water pipes and chemical pump, and the installation of a new pulse flow meter. The stand will be closed from August 17 to 24 while the upgrades are completed. The downtown water stand on Clarke Avenue will remain open 24 hours a day.

The cost for the upgrades is expected to be $17,340 with an approved budget of $34,550 for 2020.

Remaining funds will be used to install keypad access to both of the residential water wells. The district says that is currently on hold due to challenges in billing at the commercial water stand.