All of this coronavirus information can be overwhelming and frightening for children, and it’s up to parents to provide accurate information in an age-appropriate manner, one expert says.

A family wearing face masks waited at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va., a day after U.S. President Donald Trump announced travel restrictions on flights from Europe to the United States for 30 days to try to contain the coronavirus. It can be frightening for children to see scenes like this. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

There’s no escaping it. On television, in schools, on the street and at home, one word hangs in the air: coronavirus.

The coronavirus — which causes COVID-19 — and its repercussions are unlike anything people today have ever experienced. Stock markets have been plunging, travel restrictions have been put in place, major sports events have been suspended, schools are closing and an entire country, Italy, is under lockdown.

All of this information can be overwhelming and frightening for children, and it’s up to parents to provide accurate information in an age-appropriate manner, one expert says.

Julie Farrally, of Oakville, Ont., is the mother of two teenagers. She noticed heightened concern from her 15-year-old son, Noah. It started fairly early on and began with frequent handwashing.

“He’s definitely more conscious about germs,” Farrally said. “He’s definitely way more conscious about keeping the house clean, to the point where I’m like, ‘No, you’re in the house, and you’ve been in the house, you don’t need to rewash our hands.’”

It’s not that he’s paranoid, she said, just more conscious about being clean.

Youth psychiatrist Dr. Rachel Mitchell,

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