Texas 4000 riders coming to Fort St. John next week

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The world’s longest annual charity bike ride will be rolling through Fort St. John next week, 48 days into their trip from Austin, Texas to Anchorage, Alaska.

The 2017 Texas 4000 team is scheduled to arrive in the Energetic City on Thursday, July 20th. While in Fort St. John, the 2017 Texas 4000 Team will celebrate and share hope, knowledge and charity with friends and family before continuing on their 70-day journey.

Seventy-one University of Texas students from at Austin will be braving the elements as they ride more than 4,000 miles over 70 days to raise money for cancer research. Along their journey, riders will visit with cancer survivors, patients, caregivers, and communities to make educational presentations about cancer prevention and early detection. They also use this time to offer hope, encouragement and share their personal stories to cancer fighters of all ages and to those who have been affected by the disease.

Each of this year’s riders will take one of three different routes to Alaska, crossing either the Sierra Nevada, the Rockies, or the Ozark mountain ranges. The Ozark group will be the sole group of riders taking to the Alaska Highway in B.C., as the other two groups will ride to Whitehorse via the Cassiar Highway.

The Texas 4000’s Ozarks route.

In Canada, all three groups will reunite and ride the final 10 days together to Anchorage, Alaska, where the journey has ended since the ride’s inception. On each of the three routes, the riders will make stops along the way to present grants to cancer research and treatment centers.
More than 615 students have made the trek from Austin to Alaska, collectively raising more than $7 million in the fight against cancer since the ride began in 2003.

To learn more about the incredible people that make up the 2017 Texas 4000 team, to make a donation or to read the riders’ blogs, visit www.texas4000.org.

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