Ties strengethened between Lheidli T’enneh and UNBC, sign MOU

South view of the Prince George campus during the winter season. Photo by UNBC.

PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. – Ties between the University of Northern British Columbia and the Lheidli T’enneh Nation are being strengthened.

UNBC President Dr. Daniel Weeks and Lheidli T’enneh Chief Dominic Frederick met Friday to sign a MOU.

“We are happy to continue to collaborate and strengthen our ties with UNBC,” said Chief Frederick. “Today is another example of recognizing the Lheidli T’enneh traditional territory that the University’s Prince George campus is situated within.”

A new sign was also shown at the campus on University Way. The sign is written in the Dakehl (Carrier) language. The meaning translates to “house of learning”. A new flag pole has also been revealed in the rose garden in the bus loop where the Lheidli T’enneh flag will now stay permanently.

“These permanent fixtures on campus are just more examples of how the UNBC community and the Lheidli T’enneh can continue to build a co-operative, long-lasting and mutually beneficial relationship where principles of respect, communication, trust and understanding will lead to positive and meaningful collaborations and partnerships,” said UNBC President Dr. Daniel Weeks. “The fixtures also signify several of our key core values of inclusiveness and diversity which reflect the spirit of the University’s motto – En Cha Huna (that person also lives).”

Elders also worked on the project with Dr. Rheanna Robinson, UNBC’s Senior Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Relations sharing expertise and knowledge.

“It is exciting to see formal representations of UNBC’s relationship with the Lheidli T’enneh and the acknowledgement of the territory being celebrated,” said Robinson. “It has been a privilege and honour to work with the Lheidli T’enneh Elders on the language initiative, and the Memorandum of Understanding creates the foundation for a strong and resilient future of collaborative engagements with the Lheidli T’enneh community.”

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