Tory leadership race is now a four person contest

Courtesy: @ChloeEllisBC

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The provincial Conservatives no longer have a one horse leadership race, as President Ted Haraldson has confirmed there are now four declared candidates.

Chloé Ellis is a professional advisor in the financial industry raised in Port Coquitlam and now a homeowner in New Westminster, where last year she ran for the Conservative Party in the federal election.

She’s an advocate for “A leaner government, lower taxes, personal responsibility and hard work,” and she also argues far too many BC voters have been convinced they need to settle for what she calls, “The present failed government,” because not voting NDP is good enough, and she adds, “It is not good enough.”

Doctor Jay Cross, who resides in Vancouver, is a researcher and statistical analyst with a PhD in Sociology, and for two months leading up to the 2013 provincial election he worked for the online fundraising arm of the New Democrats.

He believes the Tories have important ideas, but consistently fail to achieve power, because their fundraising program is underdeveloped, and he says his leadership goal is to change that and give them the edge they need to win elections.

Konrad Pimiskern was born and raised in Horseshoe Bay but moved his family from West Vancouver to Kelowna at the beginning of the century.

He believes after more than 20 years as a financial advisor, he has “A tremendous insight into what real people are thinking and experiencing in the real world.”

However, he wants to learn more and he has launched his leadership campaign with a get-to-know-voters initiative, which includes town hall meetings, and for those who can’t attend them, an online dialogue opportunity asking for comments and questions to be sent to korad@konrad4bc.ca.

This trio has joined Dan Brooks, who is the former party leader, and was the first to declare his candidacy in the current race.

As reported earlier, he’s a guide-outfitter, who owns Crystal Lake Lodge near Vanderhoof, and he believes his experience as party leader gives him an edge in developing policy ideas that will lead to what he calls “historic results” in next spring’s election.

The party leader will be determined by a mail-in-ballot culminating in the September 17th leadership convention in Prince George.

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