Mexican Visas and Canadian beef

Photo Credit: Justin Trudeau Facebook

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – It’s been a long time coming, but Mexico has finally agreed to open its markets to Canadian beef, a move the Executive Vice-President of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association says could add $30 to $50 million to the nation’s industry.

Mexican restrictions were a lingering side effect of alleged fears over mad-cow disease, and Dennis Laycraft says this means Canadian beef, which is more than 30 months old will finally start to find its way back into Mexico.

The news came as Mexico’s President arrived in Ottawa for the North American leaders’ summit with Prime Minister Trudeau and US President Obama.

However, there was an agreement price for Canada to pay, and Mr. Trudeau delivered on an election campaign promise, to drop a major irritant in Canada’s relationship with Mexico imposed by the former Conservative government.

As of December this year, the Liberals are reversing the Harper government’s 2009 decision to require visas for Mexican visitors.

The so-called “three Amigos summit has been labelled by Jim Carr, the Winnipeg musician turned Minister of Natural Resources “An absolutely important moment,” and he adds, it’s occurring as, “We are all in a transition phase where we are reducing the reliance on fossil fuels and increasing our investments in renewable sources of energy and in innovation.”

The controversial summit was scheduled to be held last year but was cancelled amid, not only the Canadian-Mexican fight over the visa requirements, but also the Canadian-American dispute over the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

However, it now comes less than a week after British voters decided to leave the European Union—a decision mirrored by a poll of Canadian voters which shows only 25 percent of them believes the North American Free Trade Agreement is good for this country, and remember NAFTA is what we got in 1994 after it was signed, sealed and delivered by another trio of amigos.

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