Flood warning remains for Moberly River; other areas lifted

Flooding near Moberly Lake

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The B.C. River Forecast Centre is maintaining a flood warning for the Moberly River, while lifting the warning for the streams near Chetwynd, Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.

Streamflows in most of the South Peace have continued to fall overnight following peak flows on Thursday and Friday.  Most areas have reached conditions where flood risk is minimal.  Meanwhile streamflows increased overnight Friday on the Moberly, Beatton and Fontas rivers.  Flow conditions this morning, recorded by the Water Survey of Canada (WSC), are as follows:

  • Moberly River (WSC 07FB008) is recording a flow of 132 m3/s, which is close to the 20-year return period flow. Water levels have increased 18 cm overnight. Flows are forecast to begin to decrease by Saturday night.
  • Beatton River (WSC 07FC001) is recording a flow of 447 m3/s, which is below the 2-year return period flow. Water levels have increased 35 cm overnight. Flows are forecast to reach between 460 and 470 m3/s by Saturday night and begin to decrease by Sunday.
  • Fontas River (WSC 10CA001) is recording a flow of 415 m3/s, which is between the 2-year and 5-year return period flow. Water levels have increased 70 cm overnight. Flows are forecast to reach between 420 to 450 m3/s by Saturday night and then decrease on Sunday. Peak flows may approach the 5-year return period flow event.
  • Peace River above Alces River (WSC 07FD010) is recording a flow of 3981 m3/s, which is between the 5-year and 10-year return period flow. Flows will continue to gradually decrease over the weekend.River Forecast Centre – FLNRO – Province of British Columbia.

Weather conditions were generally fair on Friday with dry conditions in the South Peace region and less than 10 mm of rain recorded in the Northeast region. Weather forecasts from Environment Canada indicate dry conditions through the remainder of the weekend.

The public should stay clear of rivers during rain events due to quickly flowing water and potentially unstable riverbanks.

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