BC Hydro Responds To Royal Society Of Canada

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – BC Hydro has fired back against the Royal Society of Canada and 250 professors that say the Site C construction should be halted.

In a press release, BC Hydro says the environmental process for the project was completed back in October of 2014. They went on to say they have no records of the Royal Society participating in the process even though they had many chances to do so.

They also said they are disappointed that the Royal Society chose only to look at the nine-month joint review panel when there was actually a three-year panel completed for Site C.

BC Hydro also condemned the statement from the Royal Society that construction at Site C be stopped. The hydro company says they have a promise to keep to customers to build Site C on time and on budget.

According to the release, these are the benefits to Site C from BC Hydro.

  • Site C will be a source of both clean energy and dependable capacity for the BC Hydro system. The project will provide 1,100 megawatts of capacity and generate 5,100 gigawatt hours of energy per year.
  • As the third project on one river system, Site C will use water already stored behind the existing W.A.C. Bennett Dam in the Williston Reservoir to generate approximately 35 per cent of the Bennett Dam’s energy, with only five per cent of the reservoir area.
  • Site C will have among the lowest greenhouse gas emissions, per gigawatt hour, compared to other electricity-generation options and significantly less than fossil fuel sources. The Joint Review Panel report stated: “Site C, after an initial burst of expenditure, would lock in low rates for many decades, and would produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy than any source save nuclear.”
  • Site C will be a source of cost-effective power to meet B.C.’s future electricity needs. Over the first 50 years of Site C’s project life, ratepayers will save an average of $650 to $900 million each year, compared to alternatives. The Joint Review Panel Report stated: “Site C would be the least expensive of the alternatives, and its cost advantages would increase with the passing decades as inflation makes alternatives more costly.”
  • The project will create approximately 10,000 person-years of direct employment during construction, and about 33,000 total person-years of employment in total.
  • Site C will contribute $3.2 billion to provincial GDP during construction from the purchase of goods and services.

 

BC Hydro says the Royal Society Of Canada never asked to meet or speak with them about Site C. They say they would have been happy to provide them with any information they needed.