Key numbers from trial of couple found guilty of plotting to bomb B.C. legislature

VANCOUVER — A British Columbia couple has been found guilty by a jury of conspiracy to commit murder and possession of an explosive substance on behalf of a terrorist group.

John Nuttall and Amanda Korody were convicted by the panel of plotting to set off homemade pressure-cooker bombs at the provincial legislature on Canada Day 2013.

An undercover RCMP sting operation that led to the couple’s arrest involved hundreds of police officers and months of investigation. The accused terrorists’ trial has also lasted months, with relatively few witnesses providing jury members with lengthy testimony.

Here’s a by-the-numbers look at the alleged bomb plot and the ensuing trial:

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128: Number of days the undercover RCMP sting lasted. First contact with Nuttall on Feb. 23, 2013. His and Korody’s arrest more than 18 weeks later on July 1, 2013.

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240: At least this many police officers took part in the sting operation at one point or another. Between 20 and 30 officers were involved on a daily basis.

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3: Number of pressure-cooker bombs Nuttall and Korody are alleged to have planted on the B.C. legislature lawn on the morning of July 1, 2013.

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1: Number of grams of C4 plastic explosive used in each of the pressure-cooker bombs, which court heard were rendered inert by an RCMP explosives expert.

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0.5: Number of kilograms of C4 plastic explosive Nuttall allegedly requested for each pressure-cooker bomb.

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3: Number of kilograms of C4 plastic explosive Nuttall and Korody were ultimately told had been put into each pressure-cooker bomb by their supposed terrorist liaisons.

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102: Approximate number of hours of video and audio surveillance submitted to the court as evidence.

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4: Number of witnesses who were called by the Crown to testify in court. The defence did not call any witnesses.

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47: Number of days the operation’s primary undercover officer — also the Crown’s key witness — testified in court. About 40 of those days were in front of the jury.

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4: Number of months the trial lasted before the jury was sequestered on May 30.

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14: Number of jurors who stayed on until B.C. Supreme Court Justice Catherine Bruce delivered her instructions to the jury. That number was unchanged from Day 1 of the trial — a relative rarity for such lengthy proceedings. The number of jury members was whittled down to 12, as legally required, before they were sequestered and tasked with deciding the guilt or innocence of the accused.

The Canadian Press