A timeline of some fatal shootings of RCMP officers and the C8 patrol carbine

A timeline of some fatal shootings of RCMP officers and the force’s acquisition of the C8 patrol carbine, a high-powered semi-automatic rifle:

March 3, 2005: James Roszko uses a military assault rifle to kill four Mounties near the town of Mayerthorpe, Alta., prompting calls for better weapons.

2006: RCMP begins research into carbines and the development of a policy on what weapons, including carbines, are required.

July 7, 2006: Two officers fatally shot near Spiritwood, Sask., renewing calls from members for improved protective equipment and firepower.

2009: RCMP hires independent researcher to do needs analysis in relation to possible adoption of carbine.

2010: RCMP rejects independent report, claiming it was flawed. Report recommended adopting the carbine.

2011: Evaluation by the Canadian Police Research Centre indicates there is a gap in the RCMP’s firearms capabilities.

March 3, 2011: Fatality inquiry report into Mayerthorpe shootings recommends carbines be available for general duty officers.

Sept. 6, 2011: RCMP senior executive committee approves addition of carbine for general duty use.

2013: RCMP receives 527 carbines, begins rolling them out.

June 4, 2014: Armed with an M305 semi-automatic rifle and a 12-gauge shotgun, Bourque kills three and wounds two RCMP officers. All of Codiac’s carbines were at CFB Gagetown for the detachment’s first training session.

Jan. 16, 2015: Retired assistant commissioner Alphonse MacNeil issues report on shootings, concluding carbines would have given officers more lethal force and tactical options. Report called for expedited roll out of carbines. RCMP accepts recommendations.

April 2015: RCMP indicates it has 2,200 carbines, with more on order.

May 15, 2015: Four charges laid against the RCMP under the Canada Labour Code for allegedly failing to provide proper equipment, training and supervision in the Bourque shootings.

(SOURCE: RCMP, The Canadian Press) 

The Canadian Press

Comments

Have something you'd like to add? Read our comment policy by clicking here.