Alaska Highway study presented to Regional District


Photo: Directors at the Regional District share a laugh with delegates from the Ministry of Transportation on Thursday (L-R) – Directors Evan Saugstad, Wayne Hiebert, Bruce Lantz and Arthur Hadland – Christine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.ca

The number-one cause of accidents on the Alaska Highway is collisions with wildlife.

That is one of the findings from the Alaska Highway Corridor Study by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

District Manager of Transportation Renee Mounteney was one of the representatives who presented the findings to the Peace River Regional District on Thursday.

Researchers studied Highway 97 between Taylor and Dawson Creek.

Mounteny says the only mitigation effort in place is to increase signage along the highway.

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She says salt licks are unsuccessful at preventing wildlife from crossing the road, and fencing is not a realistic option.

The study also found the majority of traffic violations occurred during the summer months. A number of stakeholders were involved in the report, including the RCMP, ICBC, municipalities, and oil and gas commissions.

The study did not include the Taylor Hill because a separate analysis is being conducted on that large scope of road.

Meanwhile, Mounteney says the Ministry is continuing to investigate which surface option will replace the deck of the Taylor Bridge.

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The Ministry will also need to look at rerouting traffic during the upgrade, as an alternate bridge is likely not an option.

Work on the Taylor Bridge is expected to begin next year.

Click on the attachment below to view a summary of the Alaska Highway Corridor Study.

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