Duncan Cran students spreading message of hope and peace

The paper cranes are inspired by the story Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. Sadako Sasaki was a young girl in Japan when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. In the book she is remembered as trying to fold a thousand paper cranes before her death from leukemia.

"She held up and said in a quiet voice, 'I will write peace on your wings and you will fly all over the world'," tells grade 6 student Paula Smitheram.

The students are now delivering strands of 50 cranes to organizations they feel help and support the community. Yesterday they gave a strand to City Hall, and this morning delivered aptly coloured strands to the Fire Hall, RCMP Department, and NEAT offices.

"It's just our message of hope and peace to the community," explains Vice-Principal Christine Todd, who helped organize the project.

A strand of blue and yellow cranes will be sent to Rick Hansen, and white and red ones to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. A strand will also be sent to the city of Hiroshima, to be laid on the statue of Sadako on Children's Day, May 5.

About the Author

Erica Fisher

Erica is a reporter for Moose FM and energeticcity.ca in Fort St. John, B.C. She grew up in Victoria, B.C. and received her Bachelor's Degree in Journalism from Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec.